The Writings of Abraham Lincoln Vol. 1-7


iSpeech

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO W. A. NEWELL.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, April 29, 1863.

HON. W. A. NEWELL, Allentown, N.J.:

I have some trouble about provost-marshal in your first district.
Please procure HON. Mr, Starr to come with you and see me, or come to
an agreement with him and telegraph me the result.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN,

EXECUTIVE MANSION, MAY 1, 1863

GOVERNOR CURTIN, Harrisburg, Penn.:

The whole disposable force at Baltimore and else where in reach have
already been sent after the enemy which alarms you. The worst thing
the enemy could do for himself would be to weaken himself before
Hooker, and therefore it is safe to believe he is not doing it; and
the best thing he could do for himself would be to get us so scared
as to bring part of Hooker's force away, and that is just what he is
trying to do. I will telegraph you in the morning about calling out
the militia.

A. LINCOLN,

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR CURTIN

EXECUTIVE MANSION, MAY 2, 1863

GOVERNOR CURTIN, Harrisburg, Penn.:

General Halleck tells me he has a despatch from General Schenck this
morning, informing him that our forces have joined, and that the
enemy menacing Pennsylvania will have to fight or run today. I hope
I am not less anxious to do my duty to Pennsylvania than yourself,
but I really do not yet see the justification for incurring the
trouble and expense of calling out the militia. I shall keep watch,
and try to do my duty.

A. LINCOLN
P. S.--Our forces are exactly between the enemy and Pennsylvania.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL D. BUTTERFIELD.

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 3, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTTERFIELD, Chief of Staff:

The President thanks you for your telegrams, and hopes you will keep
him advised as rapidly as any information reaches you.

EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

GENERALS LOST

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL D. BUTTERFIELD.

WASHINGTON, D. C., May 3, 1863. 4.35 P.M.

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTTERFIELD:

Where is General Hooker? Where is Sedgwick Where is Stoneman?

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 4, 1863. 3.10 P M.

MAJOR-GENERAL HOOKER:

We have news here that the enemy has reoccupied heights above
Fredericksburg. Is that so?

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BURNSIDE.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, May 4, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL BURN5IDE, Cincinnati, O.:

Our friend General Sigel claims that you owe him a letter. If you so
remember please write him at once. He is here.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER.

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 6, 1863. 2.25. P.M.

MAJOR-GENERAL HOOKER:

We have through General Dix the contents of Richmond papers of the
5th. General Dix's despatch in full is going to you by Captain Fox
of the navy. The substance is General Lee's despatch of the 3d
(Sunday), claiming that he had beaten you and that you were then
retreating across the Rappahannock, distinctly stating that two of
Longstreet's divisions fought you on Saturday, and that General [E.
F.] Paxton was killed, Stonewall Jackson severely wounded, and
Generals Heth and A. P. Hill slightly wounded. The Richmond papers
also stated, upon what authority not mentioned, that our cavalry have
been at Ashland, Hanover Court-House, and other points, destroying
several locomotives and a good deal of other property, and all the
railroad bridges to within five miles of Richmond.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL HOOKER

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 6, 1863. 12.30 P.M.

Just as I telegraphed you contents of Richmond papers showing that
our cavalry has not failed, I received General Butterfield's of 11
A.M. yesterday. This, with the great rain of yesterday and last
night securing your right flank, I think puts a new face upon your
case; but you must be the judge.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO COLONEL R. INGALLS.
WASHINGTON, D. C., May 6, 1863 1.45 PM

COLONEL INGALLS:

News has gone to General Hooker which may change his plans. Act in
view of such contingency.

A. LINCOLN.

TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE POTOMAC,
May 7, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL HOOKER.

MY DEAR SIR:--The recent movement of your army is ended without
effecting its object, except, perhaps, some important breakings of
the enemy's communications. What next? If possible, I would be very
glad of another movement early enough to give us some benefit from
the fact of the enemy's communication being broken; but neither for
this reason nor any other do I wish anything done in desperation or
rashness. An early movement would also help to supersede the bad
moral effect of there certain, which is said to be considerably
injurious. Have you already in your mind a plan wholly or partially
formed? If you have, prosecute it without interference from me. If
you have not, please inform me, so that I, incompetent as I may be,
can try and assist in the formation of some plan for the army.

Yours as ever,
A. LINCOLN.

DRAFTING OF ALIENS

PROCLAMATION CONCERNING ALIENS,

MAY 8, 1863.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA:

A Proclamation

Whereas the Congress of the United States, at its last session,
enacted a law entitled "An act for enrolling and calling out the
national forces and for other purposes," which was approved on the 3d
day of March last; and

Whereas it is recited in the said act that there now exists in the
United States an insurrection and rebellion against the authority
thereof, and it is, under the Constitution of the United States, the
duty of the government to suppress insurrection and rebellion, to
guarantee to each State a republican form of government, and to
preserve the public tranquillity; and

Whereas for these high purposes a military force is indispensable, to
raise and support which all persons Ought willingly to contribute;
and

Whereas no service can be more praiseworthy and honorable than that
which is rendered for the maintenance of the Constitution and the
Union, and the consequent preservation of free government; and

Whereas, for the reasons thus recited, it was enacted by the said
statute that all able-bodied male citizens of the United States, and
persons of foreign birth who shall have declared on oath their
intention to become citizens under and in pursuance of the laws
thereof, between the ages of twenty and forty-five years (with
certain exceptions not necessary to be here mentioned), are declared
to constitute the national forces, and shall be liable to perform
military duty in the service of the United States when called out by
the President for that purpose; and

Whereas it is claimed by and in behalf of persons of foreign birth
within the ages specified in said act, who have heretofore declared
on oath their intentions to become citizens under and in pursuance of
the laws of the United States, and who have not exercised the right
of suffrage or any other political franchise under the laws of the
United States, or of any of the States thereof, that they are not
absolutely concluded by their aforesaid declaration of intention from
renouncing their purpose to become citizens, and that, on the
contrary, such persons under treaties or the law of nations retain a
right to renounce that purpose and to forego the privileges of
citizenship and residence within the United States under the
obligations imposed by the aforesaid act of Congress:

Now, therefore, to avoid all misapprehensions concerning the
liability of persons concerned to perform the service required by
such enactment, and to give it full effect, I do hereby order and
proclaim that no plea of alienage will be received or allowed to
exempt from the obligations imposed by the aforesaid act of Congress
any person of foreign birth who shall have declared on oath his
intention to become a citizen of the United States under the laws
thereof, and who shall be found within the United States at any time
during the continuance of the present insurrection and rebellion, at
or after the expiration of the period of sixty-five days from the
date of this proclamation; nor shall any such plea of alienage be
allowed in favor of any such person who has so, as aforesaid,
declared his intention to become a citizen of the United States, and
shall have exercised at any time the right of suffrage, or any other
political franchise, within the United States, under the laws
thereof, or under the laws of any of the several States.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and caused the seal
of the United States to be affixed.
Done at the city of Washington, this eighth day of May, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and of the
independence of the United States the eighty-seventh.

ABRAHAM LINCOLN.

By the President:
WILLIAM H. SEWARD

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

WASHINGTON, D. C. May 8, 1863. 4 P.M.

MAJOR-GENERAL HOOKER:

The news is here of the capture by our forces of Grand Gulf--a large
and very important thing. General Willich, an exchanged prisoner
just from Richmond, has talked with me this morning. He was there
when our cavalry cut the roads in that vicinity. He says there was
not a sound pair of legs in Richmond, and that our men, had they
known it, could have safely gone in and burned everything and brought
in Jeff Davis. We captured and paroled 300 or 400 men. He says as
he came to City Point there was an army three miles long
(Longstreet's, he thought) moving toward Richmond.

Muroy has captured a despatch of General Lee, in which he says his
loss was fearful in his last battle with you.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL J. A. DIX.

WAR DEPARTMENT, May 9,1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL DIX:

It is very important for Hooker to know exactly what damage is done
to the railroads at all points between Fredericksburg and Richmond.
As yet we have no word as to whether the crossings of the North and
South Anna, or any of them, have been touched. There are four of
these Crossings; that is, one on each road on each stream. You
readily perceive why this information is desired. I suppose
Kilpatrick or Davis can tell. Please ascertain fully what was done,
and what is the present condition, as near as you can, and advise me
at once.

A. LINCOLN.

TO SECRETARY SEWARD.

WASHINGTON, May 9, 1863

I believe Mr. L. is a good man, but two things need to be remembered.

1st. Mr. R.'s rival was a relative of Mr. L.

2d. I hear of nobody calling Mr. R. a "Copperhead," but Mr. L.
However, let us watch.

A. L.

TO SECRETARY STANTON.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON,
MAY 11, 1863

HON. SECRETARY OF WAR.

DEAR SIR:--I have again concluded to relieve General Curtis. I see
no other way to avoid the worst consequences there. I think of
General Schofield as his successor, but I do not wish to take the
matter of a successor out of the hands of yourself and General
Halleck.

Yours truly,

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL DIX.

WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON CITY, May 11, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL DIX:

Do the Richmond papers have anything about Grand Gulf or Vicksburg?

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GENERAL BUTTERFIELD.
[Cipher.] WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON CITY, May 11, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL BUTTERFIELD:

About what distance is it from the observatory we stopped at last
Thursday to the line of enemies' works you ranged the glass upon for
me?

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO GOVERNOR SEYMOUR

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, May 12, 1863.

GOVERNOR SEYMOUR, Albany, N.Y.:

Dr. Swinburne and Mr. Gillett are here, having been refused, as they
say, by the War Department, permission to go to the Army of the
Potomac. They now appeal to me, saying you wish them to go. I
suppose they have been excluded by a rule which experience has
induced the department to deem proper; still they shall have leave to
go, if you say you desire it. Please answer.

A. LINCOLN

TELEGRAM TO A. G. HENRY.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON May 13,1863.

Dr. A. G. HENRY, Metropolitan Hotel, New York:

Governor Chase's feelings were hurt by my action in his absence.
Smith is removed, but Governor Chase wishes to name his successor,
and asks a day or two to make the designation.

A. LINCOLN.

TO GENERAL J. HOOKER.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, D.C.
May 14, 1863.

MAJOR-GENERAL HOOKER, Commanding.

MY DEAR SIR:--When I wrote on the 7th, I had an impression that
possibly by an early movement you could get some advantage from the
supposed facts that the enemy's communications were disturbed and
that he was somewhat deranged in position. That idea has now passed
away, the enemy having re-established his communications, regained
his positions, and actually received reinforcements. It does not now
appear probable to me that you can gain anything by an early renewal
of the attempt to cross the Rappahannock. I therefore shall not
complain if you do no more for a time than to keep the enemy at bay
and out of other mischief by menaces and occasional cavalry raids, if
practicable, and to put your own army in good condition again.
Still, if in your own clear judgment you can renew the attack
successfully, I do not mean to restrain you. Bearing upon this last
point, I must tell you that I have some painful intimations that some
of your corps and division commanders are not giving you their entire
confidence. This would be ruinous, if true, and you should
therefore, first of all, ascertain the real facts beyond all
possibility of doubt.

Yours truly,

A. LINCOLN.

FACTIONAL QUARRELS

TELEGRAM TO H. T. BLOW AND OTHERS.

EXECUTIVE MANSION, WASHINGTON, May 15, 1863.

HON. H. T. BLOW, C. D. DRAKE, AND OTHERS, St. Louis, Mo.:

Your despatch of to-day is just received. It is very painful to me
that you in Missouri cannot or will not settle your factional quarrel
among yourselves. I have been tormented with it beyond endurance for
months by both sides. Neither side pays the least respect to my
appeals to your reason. I am now compelled to take hold of the case.

A. LINCOLN.

TELEGRAM TO JAMES GUTHRIE.

WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON CITY, May 16, 1863.

HON. JAMES GUTHRIE, Louisville, Ky.:

Your despatch of to-day is received. I personally know nothing of
Colonel Churchill, but months ago and more than once he has been
represented to me as exerting a mischievous influence at Saint Louis,
for which reason I am unwilling to force his continuance there
against the judgment of our friends on the ground; but if it will
oblige you, he may come to and remain at Louisville upon taking the
oath of allegiance, and your pledge for his good behavior.

A. LINCOLN.

TO SECRETARY OF WAR.

WAR DEPARTMENT, WASHINGTON CITY,
May 16, 1863.

HON. SECRETARY OF WAR.

MY DEAR SIR:--The commander of the Department at St. Louis has
ordered several persons south of our military lines, which order is
not disapproved by me. Yet at the special request of the HON. James
Guthrie I have consented to one of the number, Samuel Churchill,
remaining at Louisville, Ky., upon condition of his taking the oath
of allegiance and Mr. Gutlirie's word of honor for his good behavior.

Yours truly,
A. LINCOLN.

ORDERS SENDING C. L. VALLANDIGHAM BEYOND MILITARY LINES.
[Cipher.]

UNITED STATES MILITARY TELEGRAPH, May 10, 1863.
By telegraph from Washington, 9.40 PM, 1863

TO MAJOR-GENERAL BURNSIDE,
Commanding Department of Ohio.

SIR:--The President directs that without delay you send C. L.
Vallandigham under secure guard to the Headquarters of General
Rosecrans, to be put by him beyond our military lines; and in case of
his return within our lines, he be arrested and kept in close custody
for the term specified in his sentence.

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