The Philosophy of Natural Magic

The Philosophy of Natural Magic, by Henry Cornelius Agrippa, L. W. de Laurence ed. [1913], at sacred-texts.com

THE PHILOSOPHY OF NATURAL MAGIC

By

HENRY CORNELIUS AGRIPPA

VON NETTESHEIM

COUNSELOR TO CHARLES THE FIFTH, EMPEROR OF GERMANY, AND JUDGE OF THE PREROGATIVE COURT

OFFICIAL EDITION

A COMPLETE WORK ON

Natural Magic, White Magic, Black Magic, Divination, Occult Binding, Sorceries, And Their Power. Unctions, Love Medicines And Their Virtues. The Occult Virtue Of Things Which Are In Them Only In Their Life Time, And Such As Remain In Them Even After Their Death. The Occult Or Magical Virtue Of All Things, etc.

Chicago, Ill., de Laurence, Scott & Co.

[1913]

Scanned, proofed and formatted at sacred-texts.com by John Bruno Hare, June 2008. This text is in the public domain in the US because it was published prior to 1923.

The Philosophy of Natural Magic, by Henry Cornelius Agrippa, L. W. de Laurence ed. [1913], at sacred-texts.com

Dedication

THIS WORK OF OCCULT PHILOSOPHY, OR NATURAL MAGIC, BY THAT PURE MYSTIC, THINKER AND TEACHER, SCHOLAR, STATESMAN, PHILOSOPHER AND AUTHOR, HENRY CORNELIUS AGRIPPA WAS BROUGHT FORTH BY HIM THOUGH SLANDER, EDICT, AND ENEMIES OPPOSED. HE LIVED, TOILED AND TRIUMPHED IN THIS CAUSE.

TO THOSE WHO HAVE A LOVE FOR TRUTH AND MYSTIC ART THIS NEW EDITION IS DEDICATED.

AGRIPPA.

Mr. Henry Morley, an eminent English scholar, in his Life of Cornelius Agrippa, makes these tributary statements:

He secured the best honors attainable in art and arms; was acquainted with eight languages, being the master of six. His natural bent had been from early youth to a consideration of Divine Mysteries. To learn these and teach them to others had been at all times his chief ambition. He is distinguished among the learned for his cultivation of Occult Philosophy, upon which he has written a complete work.

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

INTRODUCTORY.

EDITOR’S PREFACE

EARLY LIFE OF AGRIPPA

CORNELIUS AGRIPPA TO THE READER

AGRIPPA TO TRITHEMIUS

TRITHEMIUS TO AGRIPPA

THE PHILOSOPHY OF NATURAL MAGIC

CHAPTER I. How Magicians Collect Virtues from the Three-fold World, is Declared in these Three Books

CHAPTER II. What Magic Is, What are the Parts thereof, and How the Professors thereof must be Qualified

CHAPTER III. Of the Four Elements, their Qualities, and Mutual Mixtions

CHAPTER IV. Of a Three-fold Consideration of the Elements

CHAPTER V. Of the Wonderful Natures of Fire and Earth

CHAPTER VI. Of the Wonderful Natures of Water, Air and Winds

CHAPTER VII. Of the Kinds of Compounds, what Relation they stand in to the Elements, and what Relation there is betwixt the Elements themselves and the Soul, Senses and Dispositions of Men

CHAPTER VIII. How the Elements are in the Heavens, in Stars, in Devils, in Angels, and, lastly, in God himself

CHAPTER IX. Of the Virtues of things Natural, depending immediately upon Elements

CHAPTER X. Of the Occult Virtues of Things

CHAPTER XI. How Occult Virtues are Infused into the several kinds of Things by Ideas, through the Help of the Soul of the World, and Rays of the Stars; and what Things abound most with this Virtue

CHAPTER XII. How it is that Particular Virtues are Infused into Particular Individuals, even of the same Species

CHAPTER XIII. Whence the Occult Virtues of Things Proceed

CHAPTER XIV. Of the Spirit of the World, What It Is and how by way of medium It Unites occult Virtues to their Subjects

CHAPTER XV. How we must Find Out and Examine the Virtues of Things by way of Similitude

CHAPTER XVI. How the Operations of several Virtues Pass from one thing into another, and are Communicated one to the other

CHAPTER XVII. How by Enmity and Friendship the Virtues of things are to be Tried and Found Out

CHAPTER XVIII. Of the Inclinations of Enmities

CHAPTER XIX. How the Virtues of Things are to be Tried and Found Out, which are in them Specifically, or in any one Individual by way of Special Gift

CHAPTER XX. The Natural Virtues are in borne Things throughout their Whole Substance, and in other Things in Certain Parts and Members

CHAPTER XXI. Of the Virtues of Things which are in them only in their Life Time, and Such as Remain in them even After their Death

CHAPTER XXII. How Inferior Things are Subjected to Superior Bodies, and how the Bodies, Actions, and Dispositions of Men are Ascribed to Stars and Signs

CHAPTER XXIII. How we shall Know what Stars Natural Things are Under, and what Things are Under the Sun, which are called Solary

CHAPTER XXIV. What Things are Lunary, or Under the Power of the Moon

CHAPTER XXV. What Things are Saturnine, or Under the Power of Saturn

CHAPTER XXVI. What Things are Under the Power of Jupiter, and are called Jovial

CHAPTER XXVII. What Things are Under the Power of Mars, and are called Martial

CHAPTER XXVIII. What Things are Under the Power of Venus, and are called Venereal

CHAPTER XXIX. What Things are Under the Power of Mercury, and are called Mercurial

CHAPTER XXX. That the Whole Sublunary World, and those Things which are in It, are Distributed to Planets

CHAPTER XXXI. How Provinces and Kingdoms are Distributed to Planets

CHAPTER XXXII. What Things are Under the Signs, the Fixed Stars, and their Images

CHAPTER XXXIII. The Seals and Characters of Natural Things

CHAPTER XXXIV. How, by Natural Things and their Virtues, we may Draw Forth and Attract the Influences and Virtues of Celestial Bodies

CHAPTER XXXV. Of the Mixtions of Natural Things, one with another, and their Benefit

CHAPTER XXXVI. Of the Union of Mixed Things, and the Introduction of a More Noble Form, and the Senses of Life

CHAPTER XXXVII. How, by some certain Natural and Artificial Preparations, We May Attract certain Celestial and Vital Gifts

CHAPTER XXXVIII. How We May Draw not only Celestial and Vital but also certain Intellectual and Divine Gifts from Above

CHAPTER XXXIX. That We May, by some certain Matters of the World, Stir Up the Gods of the World and their Ministering Spirits

CHAPTER XL. Of Bindings; what Sort they are of, and in what Ways they are wont to be Done

CHAPTER XLI. Of Sorceries, and their Power

CHAPTER XLII. Of the Wonderful Virtues of some Kinds of Sorceries

CHAPTER XLIII. Of Perfumes or Suffumigations; their Manner and Power

CHAPTER XLIV. The Composition of some Fumes appropriated to the Planets

CHAPTER XLV. Of Collyries, Unctions, Love-Medicines, and their Virtues

CHAPTER XLVI. Of Natural Alligations and Suspensions

CHAPTER XLVII. Of Magical Rings and their Compositions

CHAPTER XLVIII. Of the Virtue of Places, and what Places are Suitable to every Star

CHAPTER XLIX. Of Light, Colors, Candles and Lamps, and to what Stars, Houses and Elements several Colors are Ascribed

CHAPTER L. Of Fascination, and the Art thereof

CHAPTER LI. Of certain Observations, Producing wonderful Virtues

CHAPTER LII. Of the Countenance and Gesture, the Habit and the Figure of the Body, and to what Stars any of these do Answer; whence Physiognomy, and Metoposcopy, and Chiromancy, Arts of Divination, have their Grounds

CHAPTER LIII. Of Divination, and the Kinds thereof

CHAPTER LIV. Of divers certain Animals, and other things, which have a Signification in Auguries

CHAPTER LV. How Auspicias are Verified by the Light of Natural Instinct, and of some Rules of Finding of It Out

CHAPTER LVI. Of the Soothsayings of Flashes and Lightnings, and how Monstrous and Prodigious Things are to be Interpreted

CHAPTER LVII. Of Geomancy, Hydromancy, Aeromancy, and Pyromancy, Four Divinations of Elements

CHAPTER LVIII. Of the Reviving of the Dead, and of Sleeping or Hibernating (wanting victuals) Many Years together

CHAPTER LIX. Of Divination by Dreams

CHAPTER LX. Of Madness, and Divinations which are made when men are awake, and of the Power of a Melancholy Humor, by which Spirits are sometimes induced into Men’s Bodies

CHAPTER LXI. Of the Forming of Men, of the External Senses, also those Inward, and the Mind; and of the Three-fold Appetite of the Soul, and Passions of the Will

CHAPTER LXII. Of the Passions of the Mind, their Original Source, Differences, and Kinds

CHAPTER LXIII. How the Passions of the Mind change the proper Body by changing its Accidents and moving the Spirit

CHAPTER LXIV. How the Passions of the Mind change the Body by way of Imitation from some Resemblance; of the Transforming and Translating of Men, and what Force the Imaginative Power hath, not only over the Body but the Soul

CHAPTER LXV. How the Passions of the Mind can Work of themselves upon Another’s Body

CHAPTER LXVI. That the Passions of the Mind are Helped by a Celestial Season, and how Necessary the Constancy of the Mind is in every Work

CHAPTER LXVII. How the Mind of Man may be Joined with the Mind of the Stars, and Intelligences of the Celestials, and, together with them, Impress certain wonderful Virtues upon inferior Things

CHAPTER LXVIII. How our Mind can Change and Bind inferior Things to the Ends which we Desire

CHAPTER LXIX. Of Speech, and the Occult Virtue of Words

CHAPTER LXX. Of the Virtue of Proper Names

CHAPTER LXXI. Of many Words joined together, as in Sentences and Verses; and of the Virtues and Astrictions of Charms

CHAPTER LXXII. Of the wonderful Power of Enchantments

CHAPTER LXXIII. Of the Virtue of Writing, and of Making Imprecations, and Inscriptions

CHAPTER LXXIV. Of the Proportion, Correspondency, and Reduction of Letters to the Celestial Signs and Planets, According to various Tongues, and a Table thereof


BY HENRY MORLEY.

Criticism on Agrippa’s Natural Magic

Agrippa and the Rosicrucians

Exposition of the Cabala

The Mirific Word

New Table of the Cabala and Tarot (specially compiled)

Reuchlin the Mystic

Agrippa Expounds Reuchlin

The Nobility of Woman

Order of the Empyrean Heaven

Symbols of the Alchemists

BY DR. L. W. DE LAURENCE.

The Eternal Principle

A Message To Mystics, The Magic Mirror

ILLUSTRATIONS AND ETCHINGS.

Title Page of 1651 Edition

Grand Solar Man

Calamus

Characters of Nature

Divine Letters

Cabalistical Table of Co-ordinate Characters

Tree of the Cabala (three full-page etchings)

The Empyrean Heaven

Rosicrucian Symbol of the Spirit of Nature

Symbols of the Alchemists


SUBLIME OCCULT PHILOSOPHY.

JUDICIOUS READER: This is true and sublime Occult Philosophy. To understand the mysterious influences of the intellectual world upon the celestial, and of both upon the terrestrial; and to know how to dispose and fit ourselves so as to be capable of receiving the superior operations of these worlds, whereby we may be enabled to operate wonderful things by a natural power–to discover the secret counsels of men, to increase riches, to overcome enemies, to procure the favor of men, to expel diseases, to preserve health, to prolong life, to renew youth, to foretell future events, to see and know things done many miles off, and such like as these. These things may seem incredible, yet read but the ensuing treatise and thou shalt see the possibility confirmed both by reason and example.

–J. F., the translator of the English edition of 1651.

PREFACE.

In the last half of 1509 and the first months of 1510, Cornelius Agrippa, known in his day as a Magician, gathered together all the Mystic lore he had obtained by the energy and ardor of youth and compiled it into the elaborate system of Magic, in three books, known as Occult Philosophy, the first book of which–Natural Magic–constitutes the present volume. Agrippa published his Occult Philosophy, with additional chapters, in 1533. The only English translation appeared in London in 1651. It is a thoroughly edited and revised edition of this latter work that we produce. Some translating has been done and missing parts supplied. The reader is assured that while we have modified some of the very broad English of the seventeenth century, that he has a thoroughly valid work. Due care has been taken to preserve all the quaintness of the English text as far as consistent with plain reading. We have endeavored to do full justice to our author, the demands of those purely mystical, and the natural conservatism of the antiquary and collector. In this we believe we have fully succeeded.

The life of Agrippa, up to the time of writing his Occult Philosophy, is also given, drawn mostly from Henry Morley’s excellent life of Cornelius Agrippa.

That part of the volume credited to Mr. Morley maybe designated as an honest skeptic’s contribution to Mysticism, and his chapters are produced entire, as justice to both him and Agrippa cannot be done otherwise, and they are an especially valuable part of Mystic literature.

The table of the Cabala, newly compiled for this volume, will be found to possess superior features over all others.

Following the above we give a chapter on the Empyrean Heaven, which will explain much that our author has written. It is derived mainly from an old occult work on “Physic.”

The Symbols of the Alchemists will be found both useful and instructive. The chapter on the Magic Mirror, which ends the work, is believed to be the best contribution on the subject extant.

All the original illustrations and some new and selected ones will be found, as also various etchings of characters. That one on the Empyrean Heaven contains, we have cause to believe, some of the very hidden knowledge relating to the Lost Word. It is a much older plate than the work it was taken from.

Some parts of the volume will interest those who love to work out hidden things.

The editor conveys his warmest thanks to those friends who have encouraged him in the work–on the Cabala table, the illustration of the Grand Solar Man and the translating–outside of which he has not asked or received any help. This being the case our friends will please excuse any particular thing that may not sound pleasantly to the ear.

EARLY LIFE OF CORNELIUS AGRIPPA.

AT Cologne, on the 14th of September, 1486, there was born into the noble house of Nettesheim a son, whom his parents called in baptism Henry Cornelius Agrippa. Some might, at first thought, suppose that the last of the three was a Christian name likely to find especial favor with the people of Cologne, the site of whose town, in days of Roman sovereignty, Marcus Agrippa’s camp suggested and the colony of Agrippina fixed. But the existence of any such predilection is disproved by some volumes filed with the names of former natives of Cologne. There were as few Agrippas there as elsewhere, the use of the name being everywhere confined to a few individuals taken from a class that was itself not numerous. A child who came into the world feet-foremost was called an Agrippa by the Romans, and the word itself, so Aulus Gellius explains it, was invented to express the idea, being compounded of the trouble of the woman and the feet of the child. The Agrippas of the sixteenth century were usually sons of scholars, or of persons in the upper ranks, who had been mindful of a classic precedent; and there can be little doubt that a peculiarity attendant on the very first incident in the life here to be told was expressed by the word used as appendix to an already sufficient Christian name.

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