david-barbara-mikkelson-snopes

David and Barbara Mikkelson, founders of Snopes “fact checking” site.

Here’s an interesting experiment: bend your arm, palm facing outwards. Beat the back of your hand against your chest repeatedly as you jerk your head back and forth. This is what you look like when you quote Snopes as an authority. Here they are, in fact, the geniuses behind Snopes “fact checking” scam. It is a scam, and obscenity, because this nation was never meant to have a Ministry of Truth, and these two miscreants have been debunked time and time again, particularly as partisan hacks.


DNC-paid violent Trump protesters, long confirmed, which Snopes claims to have debunked.

A great quote from HNN

Donald Trump Protester Speaks Out: “I Was Paid $3,500 To Protest Trump’s Rally”

David Mikkelson, founder of Snopes, a website known for giving biased opinions of stories on the internet in order to generate advertising revenue, told ABC News that he approves of what a story like this is accomplishing.

“You have to understand that when a story like this goes viral, and we spend a minute or two debunking it, we make lots of money. Stories like this have helped put my children through college, buy a new car, a home and even get the surgery my wife Barbara wanted so I didn’t have to use Viagra anymore.” Mikkleson laughs, “We claim ‘to provide evidence for such debunkings and confirmation as well‘, but that’s just ridiculous. Do you know how much time that would take? Instead, we just copy and paste parts of the original article into ours, write a couple sentences, and that’s it.

“I just want to be clear, our website does zero journalism or anything creative, and I’m only telling you this for legal reasons. For example, do you remember that recent article we wrote debunking a story which claimed Scientology lost it’s tax-exempt status? Did you actually read it? What is the name of the person responsible? What is the actual website URL? We claim to know it, since we list the website’s disclaimer in there, but no real information is there.

“We even go as far as saying the site that started the story spreads malware and viruses, but we don’t say what website it is. I think warning people about a website that could potentially destroy their computer is probably a good idea, and I hope one day to do that kind of ethical journalism, but people will click our ads regardless, bottom line; so why do the extra work? To be honest, I’d say in a given week I probably only do about fifteen minutes of real, actual, work.”

ABC News reached out to Hillary Clinton’s campaign for comment but did not receive a response.

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